Hey everybody check out my latest release "Solstice." You can preview each tune and download mp3s for $0.99 per song. You can also download the entire album for $5.99 which is roughly half the price of individual downloads together. And for a limited time only,  you can download my entire debut album "Good Advice" for the small price of an email. Thanks in advance. Cheers, Lee!

Solstice

Solstice - 2010

In cart Not available Out of stock

Singer-songwriter Lee Bryant has followed up his debut album with an impressive collection of songs swerving from rock to country with bits of blues and bluegrass sprinkled throughout. If you like Warren Zevon, Jackson Browne or Tom Petty you will love this album “Solstice".

Read more… close
0:00 / ???
  1. 1
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 4:00
  2. 2
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 4:26
  3. 3
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 4:41
  4. 4
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 3:18
  5. 5
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 3:33
  6. 6
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 4:45
  7. 7
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 3:32
  8. 8
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 3:17
  9. 9
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 2:50
  10. 10
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 5:04
  11. 11
    In cart Not available Out of stock
    0:00 / 4:14






Production Credits - "Solstice"


Produced by Steve Connelly and Lee Bryant
Engineered and mixed by Steve Connelly at Zen Recording, Pinellas Park, FL
Mastered by David Pollock at The A Room Studio - New York, NY
Additional Engineering by Lee Bryant

The Players:
Lee Bryant – Lead and Backing Vocals, Piano, Hammond B-3 Organ, Electronic Keyboards, Acoustic Guitar, Glockenspiel, Harmonica, Hand Percussion
Steve Connelly – Lead and Rhythm Guitars, Pedal Steel, Mandolin
Dan DeGregory – Drums
T.J. Glowacki – Bass

Additional Players:
Jennifer Bryant – Backing Vocals
Dan Lankford – Tenor Saxaphone
Clayton McPeak – Trombone
Wayne Welsh – Trumpet

Graphic Design by Ed Wohtil and Lee Bryant
Photography by Carrie Waite

Thanks to my family and friends for continuing to support me in this endeavor. Special thanks to Steve Connelly for lending his creative and technical talents to this album.

All songs written by Lee Bryant.

Copyright ©2008-2010 Maxhit Inc. (ASCAP) All rights reserved.
Unauthorized duplication is a violation of applicable laws. Made in the USA.

Production Notes - "Solstice"

“Solstice” began while I was wrapping up production on my debut album “Good Advice. ” The creative process continued well after the initial batch of tunes was written for the first album. I took the same approach by creating rough demos in my home studio so I could organize my thoughts and the arrangements. If I had to critique my own work, I would say this effort is more mature and refined than the first album. I feel I had a better command of structure and form in my toolbox this time. Also the subject matter was a bit less dark.

I made a concerted effort to write more songs than I thought would end up on the album. I’ve heard that one should always have “throw-aways” to compare other tunes to on the album. This proved true. I pre-produced fifteen songs which only eleven made it to the final album. Three songs were discarded after the initial rhythm tracks were laid. Not that they were bad songs per se; they just didn’t seem to be up to par with the others. One song made it all the way through to the final mix and still seemed to fall short. I think it was the melody that turned me off because I re-wrote it making some minor tweaks and I really love it now. Maybe it will find its way onto the next album.

The production time for this album was roughly double than the debut album. Possibly because the songs were a bit trickier, but I think it was because Steve and I really put a lot of thought into each tune. We developed a vision of a hooky catchy album with memorable melodies without going totally commercial. I think we achieved that but I guess the listeners and critics will be the judge. We really obsessed on the guitar work this time, laying down multiple harmony lead tracks and layered rhythm guitar. Also I decided to take my fledgling acoustic guitar chops out for a spin which took more time because I’m fairly new at it. My main instrument is keyboards yet ironically this is a big guitar album in the strictest sense with keyboards providing mostly a supporting role.

The vocal side of things on “Solstice” is also much more thought out and refined. On “Good Advice” there is mostly two part harmony on each track. On “Solstice” there is regular three-part and sometimes four-part harmony. I also decided to include my wife Jennifer, who has a great choral voice on more songs. She really made the song on a couple of tunes like Restless Dove and Ms Right Now.

For some reason I can’t resist taking stylistic detours on my albums. Second Had Lover sounds like it should be on some old Motown record but I liked the way it turned out so much it stayed. My vision for a big bold horn section was realized by group of local Tampa players who I found through Steve. With a little studio magic, three players sounded like six and voila…big brass section. Ms Right Now has kind of a hippy reggae vibe which is a bit out of character on the album but somehow it works. The albums namesake is also my first attempt at a purely instrumental tune which turned out awesome. The tune rocks.

Technically speaking, we took the same approach on “Solstice” as we did on “Good Advice.” The formula on the first album worked so well I decided to stick with the same thing. Very little deviated in terms of equipment and personnel. The result is a consistent sound from one album to the next with some improvements. Hopefully Steve and I achieved our goal of producing a rich full-sounding -mature album without being over-produced. I hope the listeners will agree. Let me know what you think. In any event I got to play a Glockenspiel on this album. Cool.

Cheers,

Lee.


Good Advice

Good Advice - 2008

Lee’s debut album “Good Advice” released in 2008 was met with local praise and positive reviews from sites like GarageBand.com and Taxi.com. "Good Advice" has also been played on several Internet radio stations and even found its way to a small terrestrial public station in Australia. FREE w/ email.

Read more… close
0:00 / ???
  1. 1
    0:00 / 4:33
  2. 2
    0:00 / 4:53
  3. 3
    0:00 / 4:20
  4. 4
    Haunt 4:12
    0:00 / 4:12
  5. 5
    0:00 / 3:01
  6. 6
    0:00 / 4:54
  7. 7
    0:00 / 4:40
  8. 8
    0:00 / 4:21
  9. 9
    0:00 / 4:05
  10. 10
    0:00 / 3:30
  11. 11
    T-Rex 4:30
    0:00 / 4:30
  12. 12
    0:00 / 3:43


Production Credits - "Good Advice"

Produced by Steve Connelly and Lee Bryant
Engineered and mixed by Steve Connelly at Zen Recording, Pinellas Park, FL
Mastered by David Pollock at The A Room Studio - New York
Additional Engineering by Lee Bryant

The Players:

Lee Bryant – Lead and backing vocals, Piano, Hammond B-3 Organ, Electric Pianos, Farfisa Organ, Hand Percussion
Steve Connelly – Lead and Rhythm Guitars, Acoustic Guitar, Pedal Steel
Dan DeGregory – Drums
T.J. Glowacki – Electric and Upright Bass

Additional Players:
Alex Spoto – Violin and Mandolin
Bobby “Tess” – Coronet
Chris “Crash” Clifton – Trombone
Jennifer Cook – Backing Vocals, Hand Claps

Cover Concept by Lee Bryant
Album layout and design by Lee Bryant and Ed Wohtil
Photography by Jennifer Cook

All songs written by Lee Bryant.

Copyright ©2006-2008 Maxhit Inc.(ASCAP) All rights reserved.
Unauthorized duplication is a violation of applicable laws.
Made in the USA.


Production Notes - "Good Advice"

“Good Advice” started out as rough demos produced in my home studio. Much to my delight, the finished product is very close to what I had envisioned from the very beginning - a record that I would enjoy listening too. Hopefully it pays homage to some of my heroes which include the likes of Warren Zevon, Dire Straights, Tom Petty, Bob Dylan and The Band. It might be classified as “Modern Americana.” The album was produced using a fairly conventional approach.

Bass guitar and drums were recorded first along with scratch vocal and keyboard tracks. T.J. used primarily an Alembic bass guitar through an Ampeg bass combo stack. He showed off his ability on the acoustic upright bass as well. Dan elected to use the studio drum kit with his own snare that his Grandfather once used. Some kind of rare sought after Gretsch. These two guys were real pros. Nailing solid thoughtful performances in one or two takes with out any rehearsal.

Later rhythm guitar was added. Steve used a variety of electric and acoustic guitars including: Fender, Gibson, Rickenbacker and Gretsch. These were run through various guitar processors into a Fender tube amp. Steve’s production skills really came through here. What I thought would be one or two rhythm tracks per song ended up being usually four or more in stereo, intricately woven together for a masterful layering effect. This is what gives the album a very big sound.

During this time I was recording the piano tracks at home to be later imported into the project. I primarily used an Alesis piano module which produced an amazing Bosendorfer sample and a killer overdriven Rhodes patch. On a couple of tracks I elected to use an older Kurzweil module which contained various Steinway samples for a darker more old school feel. I used an E-mu module for the Farfisa track on American Tourista. Finally, I took advantage of the studio Hammond B-3 organ and Leslie speaker. This appears on almost every track.

We then moved on to lead guitar tracks. Steve’s virtuosity really shone through here. Producing this part of the album was a joy. What I verbalized to Steve almost instantaneously came out of his guitar. I would say “give me Dire Straights here” and it’s as if Mark Knopffler walked in the room. Likewise “Neil Young, David Gilmour and Mike Campbell” seemed to have shown up for the sessions as well. Steve’s ability on guitar is only matched by his ability on pedal steel.

We finished up the instrument tracking with some odds and ends including: Violin, Mandolin, Coronet and Trombone. Alex Spoto plays Violin and Mandolin well beyond his eighteen years. His solos and vamps were thoughtful and exciting in all the right spots.

“The Devil Lives in New Orleans” called out for a Dixieland jazz horn section. Tracking down some players for this task proved a real challenge. After some diligent Internet searches I found a group of older guys who still perform this music every week to an enthusiastic crowd. Bobby “Tess” plays an amazing coronet. I was astonished to find out he plays entirely by ear and works out parts with his band mates over the phone. He also had never been in the studio. After some coaxing I got him and his talented trombonist Chris Clifton to come down to the studio to record.

Finally the vocals were laid down. Steve was instrumental in refining the harmonies and making helpful suggestions. His editing skills were greatly appreciated. Jennifer Cook put the cap on things with some nice harmonies to give even more variety to the album.

The technical aspects of the recording sessions were taken with great care. We used a variety of Class A pre-amplifiers and high quality microphones during the process. API pre-amps were used in later sessions and an AKG 4050 was used for the vocals after auditioning several alternatives. The tracks were captured and mixed using Cubase SX3 through Apogee converters. A Solid State Logics rack module was used for basic signal processing of each track. Various plug-ins were also used. Most notably a UA compressor and a Space Echo reverb unit. Some drum tracks were virtually replaced using a program called Drumagog to give more punch. Primary monitoring was achieved with a pair of bi-amped Mackie studio speakers.

Mastering the album was also taken with great care. After a couple of tries at Zen Recording, which achieved satisfactory results, we decided to do the album justice and enlist a dedicated mastering house for the job. Steve had worked with a talented engineer by the name of David Pollock out of New York and suggested we use him. Thankfully, I agreed. David used Pro Tools and Apogee converters to edit the project and a Chandler-Zener Limiter for processing. The Zener Limiter is based on the vintage EMI circuits used to record The Beatles and Pink Floyd. The basic signal path used is as follows.

--> Manley Vari-MU --> 
Manley Pultec Mid-band EQ -- > 
Chandler Zener Limiter --> 
Apogee Rosetta AD ->
Waves Linear Phase EQ --> 
Waves L3 Multimaximizer

The artwork for the album was conceived of by yours truly. Having done some graphic design work in the past I was able to come up with some pretty good ideas. It was Ed Woltil, however, that was able to take an amateurish effort and make it pro.

I chose Disc Makers as the reproduction house primarily due to their reputation and customer service. They also provide some nice turn-key solutions for online marketing and distribution.

Now the hard part begins. Stay Tuned.

-Lee